The Amateur Astronomers Group is located in Alamogordo, New Mexico. The majority of our members are from South Central New Mexico. We are comprised of amateur astronomers with a variety of backgrounds and experience levels. Our group primarily supports Oliver Lee State Park and the New Mexico Museum of Space History with their astronomy events along with other local outreach opportunities. The group actively supports Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education activities in southern New Mexico and west Texas. The membership ranges from beginners to highly advanced individuals conducting scientific research. We welcome everyone, especially families and youngsters. Telescopes NOT required. Best of all membership is FREE!


CURRENT SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Oliver Lee Memorial State Park
and the
Amateur Astronomers Group


Schedule of Night Sky Programs 2018

For information call: 575-437-8284

Program Name: Scorpions and Coconut Trees
Date(s): June 16, 2018 Time: 8:00 pm to 10:30 pm Location: Meet at Group Shelter
Description: Orion the Hunter once boasted that he could kill all the animals of Earth. Juno, the wife of Jupiter, placed a scorpion on a path Orion frequented which stung and nearly killed him. To keep the peace, Jupiter vanquished both to the heavens in opposite skies so they can never meet again. The Orion constellation has set for the season, so the constellation Scorpius now rules the skies. South Pacific islands do not have scorpions so they saw the constellation as a coconut tree swaying in the wind. Which do you see? Come glimpse atmospheric bands on the planet Jupiter and star clusters in Scorpio, along with the latest findings from NASA's Juno spacecraft. For information call: 575-437-8284


Program Name: The Ringed Planet
Date(s): July 14, 2018 Time: 8:30 pm to 11:00 Location: Meet at Group Shelter
Description: The jewel of the solar system, Saturn, will be featured at this month's star party at Oliver Lee Memorial State Park. In ancient Greek stories, Saturn is known as Chronos, or father time, due to its slow apparent motion across the evening sky. In Roman mythology, Saturn is known as the god of agriculture. See Titan and learn why it is one of the most interesting moons in the solar system. Jupiter, Scorpio and the Summer Triangle also reign in the night sky. For information call: 575-437-8284


Program Name: Our Planetary Neighbors
Date(s): August 11, 2018 Time: 8:00 pm to 10:30 pm Location: Meet at Group Shelter
Description: Oliver Lee Memorial State Park and the Amateur Astronomers Group host a star party highlighting our nearest planetary neighbors Mars and Venus. 2018 provides one of the better planetary alignments for Mars and the polar caps are visible through telescopes. Venus on the other hand is shrouded in sulfuric acid clouds and has hellish surface temperatures. Learn why Mars is too cold, Venus is too hot and Earth is "just right". Deep-sky objects in Scorpio and Sagittarius abound as Earth's night sky faces our galactic center. For information call: 575-437-8284


Program Name: The First Quarter Moon
Date(s): September 15, 2018 Time: 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm Location: Meet at Group Shelter
Description: Our nearest celestial neighbor will be highlighted this month. The Sea of Tranquility and the Sea of Serenity will be along the terminator on the Moon and learn how the features got their names. These areas are the landing spots for the Surveyor 5, Apollo 11, Apollo 17 and Luna 21 missions. Venus, Jupiter, Mars and the Moon will trace out an imaginary line called the ecliptic across the sky bisecting the Milky Way. For information call: 575-437-8284


Program Name: The Milky Way
Date(s): October 6, 2018 Time: 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm Location: Meet at Group Shelter
Description: Oliver Lee Memorial State Park and the Amateur Astronomers Group host a star party highlighting the early fall evening sky. The Milky Way and the constellations of the Summer Triangle reign supreme. Ever wonder why our galaxy is called the Milky Way? Learn why the Milky Way that we do see represents only a small portion of our galaxy. Dress warmly come early and witness a beautiful Dog Canyon sunset. For information call: 575-437-8284


Program Name: Queen Cassiopeia
Date(s): November 10, 2018 Time: 5:00 pm to 8:30 pm Location: Meet at Group Shelter
Description: The AAG will be hosting a tour of the northern constellation Cassiopeia. In Greek mythology, Cassiopeia was the queen of Aethiopia who boasted about her unrivaled beauty and how Jupiter punished her by placing her in the sky. Learn about Cassiopeia's daughter Andromeda and see our large neighboring galaxy by the same name. See several colorful double stars along with the lovely Double Cluster. Dress warmly and come early to see a beautiful Dog Canyon sunset with a slim waxing Moon setting in our western sky. For information call 575-437-8284.




OTHER EVENTS

in south-central New Mexico
with the
Amateur Astronomers Group


Schedule of Programs 2018



Program Name: Rocketeer Academy
Date(s): June-July 2018 Time: 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM Location: NMMSH- Alamogordo
Description: Members of the AAG will be working with the staff of the New Mexico Museum of Space History conducting classes, star parties and building/launching rockets.





Check out which constellations are currently up in the sky with the AAG SkyViewer