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Sculptor_Galaxy.jpg
Sculptor Galaxy1370 viewsThe Great Sculptor Galaxy (NGC 253), aka the Silver Coin, in the constellation Sculptor was discovered in 1783 by Caroline Herschel. The galaxy is at a distance of 9.8 million light years away from us. Research on NGC 253 indicates that it is a starburst galaxy, which means that it has recently hosted massive and rapid burts of star formation. The image is a total of 1 hr 50 min (22 X 300 seconds) exposure with a Takahashi E-180 astrograph and Canon 20Da DSLR camera.
Messier_82_Total_exposure_685_minutes.jpg
Messier 82, a starburst galaxy1234 viewsMessier 82, a galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major, was discovered by Johann Elert Bode in 1780. Today we know M82 is a starburst galaxy where a large number of new stars are being born. Large amounts of in-falling gas are excited by the newly formed stars and are responsible for the red Ha emissions Total exposure was 11.4 hours (137 x 5 min lights) taken with a 130 mm f/8 Astro-Physics refractor and SBIG ST 2000xcm CCD camera on an Astro-Physics 1200 mount. Processed in Images Plus 4.5 and Adobe Photoshop CS5
Messier_82_in_the_constellation_Ursa_Major.jpg
Messier 82 in Ursa Major931 viewsMessier 82 in the constellation Ursa Major, which contains the familiar star group or asterism “the Big Dipper”. Messier 82 is a classic example of a starburst galaxy, in which is undergoing a high rate of star formation. This image was taken with a 130 mm f/8 Astro-Physics refractor and a SBIG ST2000xcm CCD camera on an AP1200 mount. Image was a total of 11 hrs 25 min exposure (137 x 5 min lights; 30 darks; 64 flats); Calibrated in Images Plus 5.0 and processed with PixInsight 1.8 and Photoshop CS6.
MultiscaleHaLumFinal.jpg
Messier 82725 viewsThis combined Ha and Luminance image shows the starburst galaxy Messier 82 in Ursa Major with its filamentary outflows of ionized hydrogen. This emission is suggested to be due to stellar winds caused by massive energetic young stars (as well as supernova resulting from their death) being born at a high rate within the galaxy. Total of 9 hr 20 min exposure with a Takahashi CCA-250 f/5 astrograph; Nights of 15, 28 March 2015, 12, 13 Jan 2016, 8, 9 Feb 2016; 2015 Paramount ME, QSI 683wsg, 5 nm Astrodon Ha filter (Lum 11 x 20 min @ - 20 degrees C; Ha 17 x 20 min @ - 20 degrees C), calibrated, registered, integrated, and processed in PixInsight 1.8.4.1195.
Messier82_sRGB.jpg
The starburst galaxy Messier 82715 viewsThis HaLRGB image portrays the turbulent starburst galaxy Messier 82 in Ursa Major with its filamentary outflows of ionized hydrogen. This emission is suggested to be due to stellar winds caused by massive energetic young stars (as well as supernovae resulting from their death) being born at a high rate within the galaxy. Total of 18 hrs exposure with a Takahashi CCA-250 f/5 astrograph; Nights of 15, 24, 28 March 2015; 12, 13 Jan 2016; 8, 9 Feb 2016: 2015 Paramount ME, QSI683wsg, Astrodon Gen2 filters (Ha 5 nm); (Lum 16 x 20 min; Ha 17 x 20 min; R 7 x 20 min; G 7 x 20 min; B 7 x 29 min all @ - 20 degrees C), calibrated, registered, integrated, and processed in PixInsight 1.8.4.1195 (x 64).
M82IFN.jpg
A Starburst Galaxy and the Integrated Flux Nebula (IFN)867 viewsThis HaLRGB image portrays the turbulent starburst galaxy Messier 82 in Ursa Major with its filamentary outflows of ionized hydrogen. Seen faintly in the image is the IFN, which is illuminated by the combined flux of the stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. Total of 18 hrs exposure with a Takahashi CCA-250 f/5 astrograph; Nights of 15, 24, 28 March 2015; 12, 13 Jan 2016; 8, 9 Feb 2016 in Mayhill, NM: Paramount ME, QSI683wsg, Astrodon Gen2 filters (Ha 5 nm); (Lum 16 x 20 min; Ha 17 x 20 min; R 7 x 20 min; G 7 x 20 min; B 7 x 29 min all @ - 20 degrees C), calibrated, registered, integrated, and processed in PixInsight 1.8.5.1353 (x 64).
NGC_4631_RCOSf6_DarkMottleRepFinal_Large.jpg
The Whale Galaxy in Canes Venatici549 viewsNGC 4631 is found in the constellation Canes Venatici. The wedge-shape of this galaxy gives rise to its nickname, the Whale Galaxy. The starburst regions of this galaxy can be seen in the photo, which are due to intensive star formation. Tidal interactions of NGC 4627, which is seen just above NGC 4631, has been suggested as one of the reasons for the active core of NGC 4631 (as well as tidal interactions with other nearby galaxies). The small edge-on galaxy at the top of the image is PGC 3794315 (NASA Extragalactic Database). Total of 5 hr 40 min exposure taken with an SBIG STF8300c CCD camera and a 12.5 inch RCOS f/9 astrograph operating at f/6 (Astro-Physics CCDT067 reducer) mounted on a Paramount ME on the nights of 8, 15, 16 May 2018 in Mayhill, New Mexico (17 x 1200 sec Lights @ -15 degrees C; 15 darks; 128 bias; 128 flats). Processed with PixInsight 1.8.5.1353 Ripley (x64).
 
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